Tick Fact FileTick Fact File

Ticks are the vampires of the parasite world! They hide in the undergrowth of our countryside and parkland and when they sense an animal pass by, they hop on board to feed on its blood. (They are partial to human blood too!) Tick saliva contains an anaesthetic so your pet will not feel them bite and neither will you. TICKS ARE A HEALTH RISK! They spead diseases such as. Lyme Disease: In dogs it can cause lameness, fever, loss of appetite, tiredness, swollen joints and sometimes kidney failure. Babesiosis: A microscopic parasite carried by ticks that ...

Read More

Beware For Your Rabbit in SummerBeware For Your Rabbit in Summer

Fly Strike in Rabbits THIS IS AN EMERGENCY CONDITION Fly strike can be a devastating condition for rabbits. Flies are attracted to damp fur soiled with urine and faeces on the rabbit and begin to lay eggs. These eggs hatch within hours into maggots which feed on the rabbits flesh and being to grow rapidly. Rabbits can literally be ‘eaten alive’. Symptoms Flies around hutch, especially in summer Lethargic rabbit Rabbit eating and pooing less Diarrhoea Wounds on the rabbit Maggots on rabbit  Prevention Check your ...

Read More

New Additions to Flea and Parasite Treatments New Additions to Flea and Parasite Treatments

This spring there are many new and exciting products becoming available for dogs and cats. BROADLINE: What the cat world has been waiting for!! An all singing, all dancing, monthly treatment that covers against fleas, ticks, lice, roundworms AND tapeworms, in one easy spot-on application.   VECTRA 3D: Ideal for dogs who like to travel, both in the UK and abroad. Suitable for use under the pets travel scheme, this spot on treatment repels and kills fleas, ticks, mosquitos, lice, sand flies and mites. Use monthly with Milbemax worming tablets to cover against ...

Read More

Pet PassportsPet Passports

Are you planning to take your pet on holiday? Our vets are happy to provide you with all the help you need to travel in and out of the UK with your pet. The Pets Travel Scheme allows dogs, cats and ferrets to travel easily between the UK and qualifying countries with a Passport. This means there is no need for your pet to spend time in quarantine. The basic requirements of travel are: A microchip- your pet MUST be chipped before any further stages can be completed A rabies vaccination and subsequent issuing of a Pet Passport. You will need to wait until 21 days after ...

Read More

Top ten tips to keep your pets happy during the fireworks seasonTop ten tips to keep your pets happy during the fireworks season

Provide a den or hiding place for your pet whilst fireworks are going off. Use an Adaptil or Feliway Diffuser as close to the den or hiding place as possible, or where your pet spends most of its time. Ignore fearful behaviour, dogs may pick up on their owners' anxiety making the problem worse. Walk your dog early in the evening before fireworks start. Ensure windows, doors and cat flaps remain closed during firework season to both prevent pets escaping and reduce the noise. Ensure your cats have access to enough litter trays during firework season ...

Read More

Pet MicrochippingPet Microchipping

Microchipping for your pet can be done at your second vaccination, neutering or at an alternative appointment. The chip is placed under the skin between the shoulders and can be scanned to trace your pet back to you if they get lost or involved in an accident.

Read More

VaccinationsVaccinations

It is very important that all new puppies and kittens receive a primary course of vaccinations to protect them against a number of potentially life threatening diseases. Dogs - Puppies are vaccinated at 8 to 10 weeks of age. They are routinely vaccinated against Parvovirus, Leptospirosis, Distemper and Hepatitis. Please ensure that your new puppy does not come into contact with unvaccinated dogs and is kept off the ground in public until 7-10 days after the second vaccination. Before this time your puppy can go on car journeys and out into your own garden providing it is secure. We ...

Read More

Pet InsurancePet Insurance

Unfortunately there is no NHS for your pets so we strongly recommend you have pet insurance. There are a variety of insurance companies providing pet insurance and we recommend that you choose one which will provide "Lifetime cover" for your pet. Beware of "Cheap" insurance as they may not provide full cover.

Read More

NeuteringNeutering

We strongly recommend that you neuter your puppy/kitten when they reach a suitable age and stage in their development. Dogs - Male dogs can be castrated from 6 months of age. If your dog has only one or no descended testicles then castration is particularly recommended as they are at a greater risk of getting cancer later in life. Bitches - Female dogs will have their first season from 6-18 months of age. We recommend you allow them to have one season and then spay them around 3 months later. Spaying bitch before their third season greatly reduces their risk of mammary tumours and ...

Read More

WormingWorming

Many pet shop brands are less effective and less convenient to administer so we recommend using a veterinary prescribed wormer such as Milbemax as your routine worm treatment. Dogs - We recommend that puppies are wormed monthly until 6 months of age and then every 3 months from then onwards. Lungworm (carried by slugs and snails) - we recommend Advocate. This can be used monthly, or twice per year as we are not in a high risk area. Cats - Your vet will frequently prescribe your initial Milbemax cat worming tablets. Once your cat starts to go out they will need worming every 3 ...

Read More

Treating a fear of the veterinary clinic using desensitization and counter-conditioningTreating a fear of the veterinary clinic using desensitization and counter-conditioning

Fear of a specific place, such as the veterinary clinic, can be treated using a desensitization and counter-conditioning (DSCC) programme. In simple terms, your pet must be exposed to the fearful stimulus in such a way that he/she sees there is nothing to fear, and settles down. If the association with the stimulus can be turned into one that is positive, your pet may actually develop a positive attitute to the occurrence. This programme generally involves multiple and controlled visits to the clinic, starting with visits involving no direct manipulation and only positive ...

Read More

Cognitive dysfunction syndromeCognitive dysfunction syndrome

Behaviour problems in senior pets These can be due to a wide variety of medical conditions, including pain, sensory decline, or any disease that affects the nervous system. Behaviour problems may also be attributed to age-related degeneration within the brain known as cognitive dysfunction syndrome (CDS), or can arise from changes in the household or environment to which it may be difficult for senior pets to adapt. Early detection provides the best opportunity for resolving problems, preventing complications or slowing decline. Prevening problems - what you can do For ...

Read More

Adopting a rescue dog: the pros and consAdopting a rescue dog: the pros and cons

Many people choose dogs from rescue organizations or animal shelters; others avoid rescue dogs, due to worries about the dog’s health or behaviour. Here are some of the advantages and disadvantages of adopting a dog from a reputable animal shelter or rescue group. Breeds By adopting a mixed-breed dog from a shelter, you might be reducing the risk of medical problems which are associated with purebreds. Purebred dogs are also often available at shelters, but popular breeds may be difficult to acquire. You may have less background information available than if ...

Read More

Introducing a new cat into the householdIntroducing a new cat into the household

Introducing a new cat to a home where cats already live can lead to severe disruption and upset if done without planning and control. The introduction process may take only days but can be as long as several weeks to several months. Following a specific protocol will help make the introduction as trouble-free as possible. Pheromone sprays Two weeks before the introduction, an 'F3' pheromone product such as Feliway® can be used in both the new and resident cats’ areas; this is available as a diffuser or spray and is applied to the environment. An 'F4' product such as ...

Read More

The newly adopted rescue dog: preventing problemsThe newly adopted rescue dog: preventing problems

Bringing home a new dog is exciting and fun, but remember that your home is a big change from life in the rescue centre and this can be stressful to the new dog. Most dogs appear calmer and quieter than normal for the first few days to weeks. After this ‘honeymoon’ period is over, a different version of your dog may emerge; this new dog may be more destructive, boisterous, and seeking of attention. Many of these problems can be prevented by following these recommendations. Create a structured routine for your dog A consistent schedule may help your dog to settle ...

Read More

What your cat needs: multi-cat householdsWhat your cat needs: multi-cat households

Many owners have more than one cat at home. Cats that are related, or that have been together since kittenhood, are more likely to get on than cats that have been introduced as adults. There are several things you can do to make it easier for your cats to live in harmony. Space Make sure that there is sufficient space for your cats both horizontally and vertically. Cats like to climb and spend a lot of their time off the floor on raised surfaces, such as shelves placed at different heights, window sills, cat activity centres or even the tops of wardrobes and cupboards if ...

Read More

Treating separation anxiety in dogsTreating separation anxiety in dogs

Changing how you leave home, changing your interactions with your dog and uncoupling departure cues from actual departures will allow you to accustom your dog to planned training departures for teaching him/her how to be home alone without anxiety. Diminishing anxiety on routine departures Leave the dog a toy that has been enhanced with food. Try to mask departure with other noises, depart by a different door or wear different clothing. Keep departures and returns low key. Ignore the dog for 10–15 minutes prior to leaving and on return. Changing ...

Read More

Treating a fear of car journeys using desensitization and counter-conditioningTreating a fear of car journeys using desensitization and counter-conditioning

Fear of a specific activity, such as a car journey, can be treated using a desensitization and counter-conditioning (DSCC) programme. In simple terms, your pet must be exposed to the fearful stimulus in such a way that he/she sees there is nothing to fear, and settles down. If the association with the stimulus can be turned into one that is positive, your pet may actually develop a positive attitude to the occurrence. Preparation Prevent your pet from travelling in the car except during training sessions, unless essential for health reasons. Setbacks may occur if your pet ...

Read More

Your puppy’s first yearYour puppy’s first year

Giving your puppy the right experiences in his/her first year of life will build a firm foundation for good behaviour in the future. Toilet training Use a range of places, such as grassed areas, concrete, areas with or without trees and plants. Puppies toilet trained only on newspaper or on grass may develop a preference for this and refuse to use alternatives, causing difficulties if travelling or being kennelled. Vary the routine and vocal cues. Dogs trained always to go at certain times, or after specific visual or vocal cues, can experience problems when routines are ...

Read More

Avoiding urine marking by catsAvoiding urine marking by cats

There are some practical steps that you can take to help stop your cat urine marking in your house. Neutering Arrange for all cats in the home to be neutered. Reduce conflict or stress In multi-cat households, resources such as feeding stations, water sources, litter trays and resting perches should be plentiful and distributed throughout the environment. There should always be as many resource stations as there are cats, plus one additional resource station. If intercat aggression/tension seems to be contributing to the marking behaviour, periodic (4–6 ...

Read More

Handling exercises for puppies and kittensHandling exercises for puppies and kittens

A pet needs to learn to accept, and look forward to, all types of handling it will encounter throughout its life. Family members should introduce the pet to brushing, bathing, nail trims, and other types of procedure in a calm way, without causing any anxiety or resistance. The goal is to show your pet that handling is a good thing and should not cause excitement, fear or anxiety. Pick a time when your pet is relaxed, and already quiet and calm; not after play or before meals when he/she is aroused. Handling exercises should be practised without using any type of force or ...

Read More

Puppy socialization: getting used to new peoplePuppy socialization: getting used to new people

Every puppy should meet as many new people as possible during the early months of its life. Your puppy should meet a variety of people – different ages, sex and appearance – in a wide range of situations. Biscuits Asking each new person who meets the puppy to give him/her a small biscuit treat can be helpful. The puppy will then look forward to meeting people and will learn to associate new friends and an outstretched hand with something positive, thereby discouraging hand-shyness. Once the puppy has learned to sit on command, each new person can be asked to ...

Read More